It’s Okay, Don’t Cry!

I happen to love the favor of onions. But I don’t love the process of cutting them up. First off, no matter how hard you try, you always start tearing up. And don’t even think about wiping your eyes with your onion covered hands! SO I wanted to learn why you tear up, and, how do you stop it?

Onions are made up of a tunic of outer leaves, scales, and the basal plate. One site puts the reason, “When you cut the basal plate or shoot, they release an enzyme.That enzyme reacts in the rest of the onion to release a gas. When that gas combines with water, it creates an acid. If that water is in your eye, you have acid in your eye. That makes you cry.”

To prevent tearing up, you could use a variety of ways, like a very sharp knife. What releases the enzymes is broken or crushed cells, and, by using a sharper knife, more cells are sliced, therefore emitting less enzymes. Putting them in the refrigerator for 10-15 minutes before you cut them can also help, as this reduces the amount of the acid enzyme released into the air. Another way to stop the tears is to wear goggles or contacts, as it creates a barrier between your eyeballs and the air. Cutting the onion underwater or near steam or running will work too. Just to be safe, try breathing through your mouth, or with your tongue sticking out.

For more ways, see the link below. Cutting onions is something everyone does at least once, and now you can master the chopping block without tearing up!

Links:

http://www.wikihow.com/Chop-Onions-Without-Tears

So ta ta for now and I hope to see your chemical reaction soon!

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