DIY Deoderant

I don’t know about you, but, when you have French class with a lot of other people that have gym with you right before, we tend to be a little smelly, depending on the day’s activity. But, besides the obvious reasons why you wouldn’t want to smell, helping prevent sweat is also good. That’s why I wear deodorant, just like most people in our world. While it is your choice, here’s how to make your own deodorant, and the chemical background of it.

Many deodorants today are filled with chemicals that aren’t safe to use on broken skin. Sweating releases toxins, and we don’t want to be taking in some of the harmful chemicals in our deodorant like, “…aluminum, parabens, triclosan, talc, propylene glycol and phthalates, all of which are harmful when absorbed through the skin.”  Skin absorbs most everything, so, even if there is a warning not to put on broken skin, whatever is in it can still be absorbed. organic products, or ones made yourself, are most ;likely the best way to go, although many companies have started producing organic  or toxic-free deodorant, which is much healthier for you. 

One article states which common chemicals to avoid and why: “

  • Aluminum. Scientists are looking at the link between Alzheimer’s disease and aluminum. It could come in the following forms: aluminum chlorohydrate, aluminum zirconium tetrachlorohydrex gly or other aluminum compounds.
  • Parabens. This group of chemicals is widely used as a preservative in the cosmetic industry. Parabens can mimic the hormone estrogen, which is known to play a role in the development of breasts
  • Triclosan. Thought to contain carcinogenic contaminants which can be stored in body fat.
  • Talc. A known carcinogen, irritant, cause of lung asphyxiation and possible link to uterine cancer. On a softer note, it clogs pores and causes acne.
  • Propylene glycol. A neurotoxin that may cause liver and kidney damage.
  • Phthalates. Shown to damage the liver, kidneys, lungs and reproductive system in animal studies.

To check out some of the FAQ’s of deodorants, check out the link below! Now, onto how to make your own organic deodorant, so that you don’t have to look at teh long lists of ingredients on the back of deodorant in the supermarket.

Ingredients:

  1.  1/4 cup arrowroot powder (as a thickening agent)
  2. 1/4 cup baking soda
  3. 4 tbsp coconut oil (nice moisturizer!)
  4. 10+ drops grapefruit oil
  5. a jar or tin with a lid (to store it in)

Mix all of the ingredients together well. If you want, you can use a hand mixer. It should become a mixture with a balm-y consistency. To keep it solid, store in a relaticely cold place, like a fridge. And that’s it!

Now, she just said to apply the deodorant with your hands, but I think you could take a toothbrush, or a hollowed out chap-stick/deodorant tube and use that. Or you could get a sponge or something. get creative as you enjoy your toxin-free, and deliciously smelling, deodorant!

 

Links:

http://aprettypennyblog.com/category/diy/page/11/

http://health.howstuffworks.com/skin-care/underarm-care/tips/deodorant.htm

So ta ta for now and I hope to see your chemical reaction soon!

Trick Candles

One of the common things when you go to birthday parties is candles. Candles in cupcakes, brownies, cookies, ice-cream cake, just about any dessert you can think of. But no matter what medium the candle is in, on must beware of the dreaded TRICK CANDLE!

That’s right! The candles that never go out. But how do they work? And why on earth would someone create them?

Usually, when you blow out a candle, you see or smell smoke, and if you watch closely, there are still embers left over that glow red-hot. My friend Lindsey’s post summarizes it well. She writes, “To explain trick candles, let me explain regular candles first. After you blow out a regular candle, little smoke comes off the wick, and this is vaporized paraffin. Paraffin in vaporized paraffin is candle wax.” Now, if you haven’t already read my post on candles, click here to learn more! The embers left after the candle is blown out is hot enough to vaporize paraffin, but not to light it up again. However, in a trick candle, that’s exactly what you need to do. The key is to add something to the candle to make it continuously light up, even when blown out.

The most common “key” used is magnesium, as it is a metal, making a good conductor that can burn. One article states, “Inside the burning wick, the magnesium is shielded from oxygen and cooled by liquid paraffin, but once the flame goes out magnesium dust is ignited by the ember. If you watch the ember you will see tiny flecks of magnesium going off. One of them produces the heat necessary to re-light the paraffin vapor, and the candle flame comes back to life!” In other words, the magnesium is protected and cooled, but is vulnerable after the candle goes out, allowing it to be the “lighter” of the new flame, and so on and so forth.

Trick candles are cool, but some people may not like them. Then again, you can use it as a prank for your annoying older sister…

Links:

http://science.howstuffworks.com/innovation/science-questions/question420.htm

http://chemistry2013-14.tumblr.com/post/67269673550/relating-it-back-to-chemistry-trick-candles

So ta ta for now and I hope to see your chemical reaction soon!